Kris’s Reflections on ‘The Invention of Hugo Cabret’

Sep 28, 2016   //   by Kris   //   Age 9-15, Kids' Panel  //  Comments Off on Kris’s Reflections on ‘The Invention of Hugo Cabret’

The Invention of Hugo Cabret is a historical fiction book. It’s written and illustrated by Brian Selznick. The book takes place in Paris following a young boy named Hugo Cabret. The book is 526 pages long, not including the credits and sources.

Stop! Wait, don’t dismiss this book for being long or historical. This book has so much to offer. It gives you a glimpse of the city of Paris and its residence. You’ll follow the life of Hugo Cabret, who is left to fend for himself.

Hugo is very talented with clocks and mechanics like his father. Hugo’s father was working on fixing a mechanical man at a museum late at night. The museum guard locked the entrance, forgetting Hugo’s father was in there. A fire broke out and Hugo’s father died. Hugo stays with his uncle. Hugo’s uncle would leave Hugo unattended for long periods of time, until one day he disappears altogether. When wandering the streets, Hugo sees the mechanical man thrown out and vows to fix it. I could go on but I don’t want to give away spoilers.

The book is fast-paced and primarily composed of illustrations. The illustrations give a soft and dream-like appearance that’ll capture your attention. The Invention of Hugo Cabret is an educational and entertaining book since it’s historical fiction. The book discusses early cinema in France, clockwork, mechanics and automatons.  The book has it’s own website and has also been made into a movie.

Kris’s bio

Kids’ panellist Kris.

Kids’ panellist Kris.

Kris is 14 years old. She’s a librocubicularist (a person who reads in bed).

A movie that she recently watched and enjoyed was Kubo and the Two Strings.

The classic Christmas movie Home Alone is loved by Kris and her family.

She shares her fondness of the TV show Case Closed with her siblings.

An artist style she likes is Tim Burton’s for its whimsical and dark combination.

Kris delights in learning, which fuels her affection for school.

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Meet our kids' panel: a savvy group of kids with a strong point of view about the media and the culture they consume. Culturally diverse, a range of age and interests, they'll provide you with an insight into kids' media ... what works, what doesn't and why. Check back every month for new reviews. We think you'll be inspired!

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